Wedding With Zimbabwean Traditions

“After years of fervent prayer, waiting and waiting, the Lord has finally brought this Presbyterian pastor out of the darkness and into my life,” Tafadzwa recalls his experience with her husband Mark.

After a lovely proposal at the top of Bear Mountain in New York, the couple jumped right into wedding planning. They got engaged in August and married in December! It was a quick four-month turnaround, but their winter wedding was a beautiful mix of traditions and design elements of the culture and country of the bride and groom. Tafadzwa release”, “I thought it would be a good moment” look at my culture zimbabwean d “use a fabric of ethnic origin, my dresses bridesmaid d” honor, cummerbund groom, bow tie and square bag, and also the boys d ” honor and paige butterfly knot and square bag. We used a printed pattern of the same fabric for programs and table cutlery. We also put together a wedding dance, which we call “great march”, which the guests enjoyed very much. A great walk is very Zimbabwe and something has been done at every wedding.”

See all the gorgeous details of this chic and multicultural wedding below.

Facts at a glance

  • Wedding flowers: the main flower was the African protea with roses and peonies.
    Favorite dish on the menu: halibut in pignoli crust, braised in pancetta broth and seasonal vegetables.
  • Bridesmaids / Groomsmen Gifts: Bow Tie imported African prints and pocket squares for groomsmen and dusty Blue Swarovski Crystal Earrings for bridesmaids.
  • First Dance Song: the first dance song was a mashup of a Shona song (Runonzi Rudo by PAH Chihera, feat. Prince K. Musarurwa) and a Classic American rock song (Rock and Roll Again by Blackberry Smoke).

Tell us how you met and all about the proposal.

After years of fervent prayer, waiting and waiting, the Lord has finally brought this Presbyterian shepherd out of the darkness and brought him into my life. Then, on a mild August afternoon, the pastor decided to take my sister, who lives in South Africa, and me on a trip to Bear Mountain ascension in New York. After a strenuous hike to the top of the mountain, hot and sweaty, he asked my sister to photograph us, then got down on his knees, pulled out a ring and asked me to marry him.

I got engaged on August 30th and I immediately started planning my wedding, which was on December 29th. The preparation time was short. It was stressful and exciting to the same extent, but I wouldn’t have had it otherwise. It’s hard to believe that all this came together in just four months. My sister played an important role in the realization of our beautiful marriage.

How did you know you were “the only one”?

I knew it was him because I felt safe with him. The relationship was really simple, and I was comfortable being fully myself around him. What won the matter was the fact that he loved my hair in a natural state. He loved my “lite eyes”, as he calls them. He knew I was the one because, ” the more he got to know me, the more he knew he couldn’t live without me.”

Have you integrated a culture into your marriage?

Yes! I thought it would be a good moment to” look at my culture d “using a fabric of ethnic origin, my flower girl dresses, cummerbund groom, bow tie and square bag, and also the boys d” honor and paige knot-butterfly-boys and square bag. We used a printed pattern of the same fabric for programs and table cutlery. We also put together a wedding dance, which we call “great march”, which the guests enjoyed very much. A great walk is very Zimbabwe and something is done at every wedding.

Describe your wedding dress and your favorite wedding accessory.

My wedding dress was a mikado strapless mermaid dress with flattering stitching and floor buttons on the back. My favorite accessory was my fur coat, which was “borrowed” from my dear friend Kimberly.

What is your best memory of your wedding?

It’s really hard to choose, because there were a lot of them. The moment my sister put on my veil so carefully and attentively was so special and emotional. Walking down the aisle with my older brother on a Shona song called huyai by Tembelami was a poignant moment. The song essentially says, Lord come walk with me. Then, after being pronounced as Mr and Mrs Wellman, I danced In the alley instead of P person like U. It was improvised so you can imagine the surprise of my husband. I feel like he totally adored. Then, immediately after, our Zimbabwean family circled us dancing and swinging as they sang a traditional Shona song greeting the bride. Shona is my native language and comes from Zimbabwe. At the end of this electrifying moment, we were surrounded by happy families and friends who celebrated us. And finally have the” father and daughter dancing ” with the guy who held my hand for as long as I remember; my twin brother and best friend. We danced to Johnny Gill’s ” Fairweather Friend.”

Tips for brides:

After making all the preparations for the wedding, take a deep breath and let yourself go. The day goes by so fast! Take advantage of this short time to enjoy your day. Dance enthusiastically, laugh hysterically, smile through happy tears and lock yourself in all the love and adoration of your family and friends! Above all, radiate gratitude!

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